• Publicaties
  • Lijst van organisaties
  • Media
  • Human trafficking / trafficking in persons
  • 2017
Resultaten 1 - 5 van totaal 5 resultaten
  1. Language English 1 read Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) Annex to the Response of the Kingdom of the Netherlands to the list of issues (CAT/C/NLD/QPR/7) transmitted to the State Party under the optional reporting pro ...

    Annex to the Response of the Kingdom of the Netherlands to the list of issues (CAT/C/NLD/QPR/7) transmitted to the State Party under the optional reporting procedure (A/62/44, paras. 23 and 24)

    Publicaties

    • Rapporten
    • Netherlands
    • Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR)
    • Human trafficking / trafficking in persons
    • Torture
    • Human Rights
    • Engels
  2. Taal Engels James Cockayne United Nations University Abstract by author:   Human trafficking is both illegal and big business. The International Labour Organization estimates that forced labour, one of the forms of exploitation into which h ...

    Abstract by author: Human trafficking is both illegal and big business. The International Labour Organization estimates that forced labour, one of the forms of exploitation into which humans are trafficked, generates $150 billion a year in revenues, while the Global Slavery Index suggests there may be as many as 45.8 million people enslaved today. Most of the victims are women and girls. The funds generated by human trafficking are proceeds of crime. Handling those funds can constitute money laundering or, in certain cases where designated terrorist organizations are involved, terrorist financing. Financial institutions that handle funds generated by human trafficking and modern slavery, or that finance businesses that engage in these crimes, thus risk violating a range of existing laws and norms, especially in the area of anti-money laundering (AML) and countering the financing of terrorism (CFT). To help industry actors and regulators think through their options for disrupting ties between the financial sector and human trafficking and modern slavery, UN University convened a workshop at Grace Farms in New Canaan, Connecticut, with the support of the Permanent Mission of Liechtenstein to the United Nations. Participants identified three main areas for action: strengthening sectoral knowledge uptake; improving regulation and encouraging leadership; and promoting information partnerships.

    Publicaties

    • Rapporten
    • International
    • James Cockayne
    • United Nations University
    • Human trafficking / trafficking in persons
    • modern slavery
    • financial sector
    • Engels
  3. Taal Engels Allison J. Luzwick Abstract The Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000 (TVPA) was passed to “combat trafficking in persons, a contemporary manifestation of slavery whose victims are predominantly women and children, to ensur ...

    AbstractThe Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000 (TVPA) was passed to “combat trafficking in persons, a contemporary manifestation of slavery whose victims are predominantly women and children, to ensurejust and effective punishment of traffickers, and to protect their victims.”Since the passing of the Act, federal courts have construed the statute broadly to achieve this stated purpose. One way in which the TVPA has been underutilized, however, is in prosecuting pornography cases. Pornography enjoys wide latitude under the law, protected by a vast net of First Amendment protections. While these protections may preserve freedom of speech, they do nothing to protect adult victims who are trafficked to produce online pornographic media. To provide relief for these victims and better fight all types of domestic trafficking, prosecutors should use the sex trafficking provision of the TVPA, 18 U.S.C. § 1591, to prosecute sex trafficking within the pornography industry. The pattern of victimization, other national and international human trafficking directives, plain language of the TVPA, prior cases, and broader policy goals all support the argument that the TVPA can and should be used to address the problem of trafficking adult victims for the production of porn.

    Publicaties

    • Wetenschappelijke Artikelen
    • Verenigde Staten van Amerika
    • Allison J. Luzwick
    • Human trafficking / trafficking in persons
    • Engels
  4. Taal Engels 1 Jaclyn D. Houston-Kolnik PhD Christina Soibatian MA Mona M. Shattell PhD RN FAAN Abstract: The present qualitative study explores advocates’ opinions of misinformation about human trafficking in the media and describes advocate ...

    Abstract:The present qualitative study explores advocates’ opinions of misinformation about human trafficking in the media and describes advocates’ strategies to counter the misinformation presented by the media. Thus, 15 advocates who work against human trafficking in Chicago-based nonprofit organizations participated in semistructured interviews about their opinions and strategies. Data were analyzed using thematic content analysis. The present study identifies specific misperceptions of human trafficking in the media, highlights advocates’ opinions of this misinformation, and discusses advocates’ strategies to counteract inaccurate media, adding support to the role of media advocacy. Advocates note how media images shape and perpetuate stereotypes of trafficking through glamorizing sex work and sensationalizing stories that are most often international depictions of trafficking. Advocates report media generally shares only a piece of the story, simplifying the stories of survivors and the issue of human trafficking. Advocates critique media perpetuating these misperceptions for how they may contribute to policies and programs which fail to address structural factors that create vulnerabilities to be trafficked and the multisystem needs of survivors. However, advocates also note misperceptions can be counteracted by producing sensitive, informed media through social platforms. Advocates share their strategies counteracting misinformation through engaging in informative conversations, utilizing social media to educate, and promoting media messages of survivor agency. Research, clinical, and policy implications are also discussed. The present study emphasizes the importance of decision makers and service providers being critical consumers of media and to assess how media portrayals may (or may not) inform their understanding and response to the issue.

    Publicaties

    • Wetenschappelijke Artikelen
    • Verenigde Staten van Amerika
    • Jaclyn D. Houston-Kolnik PhD
    • Christina Soibatian MA
    • Mona M. Shattell PhD RN FAAN
    • Human trafficking / trafficking in persons
    • media
    • advocaten
    • Engels
  5. Taal Engels Christina Bloem MD MPH Rikki E. Morris DO and Makini Chisolm-Straker Abstract Given the significant global burden of human trafficking, the ability of clinicians to identify and provide treatment for trafficked persons is critic ...

    Abstract Given the significant global burden of human trafficking, the ability of clinicians to identify and provide treatment for trafficked persons is critical. Particularly in conflict settings, health care facilities often serve as the first and sometimes only point of contact for trafficked persons. As such, medical practitioners have a unique opportunity and an ethical imperative to intervene, even in nonclinical roles. With proper training, medical practitioners can assist trafficked persons by documenting human trafficking cases, thereby placing pressure on key stakeholders to enforce legal protections, and by providing adequate services to those trafficked.

    Publicaties

    • Wetenschappelijke Artikelen
    • International
    • and Makini Chisolm-Straker
    • Christina Bloem
    • MD
    • MPH
    • Rikki E. Morris
    • DO
    • Conflict areas
    • Health care
    • Ethics
    • Human trafficking / trafficking in persons
    • Engels